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Czech Senior COMPANION: Wizard of Oz Data Collection and Expressive Speech Corpus Recording and Annotation

  • Martin Grůber
  • Milan Legát
  • Pavel Ircing
  • Jan Romportl
  • Josef Psutka
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6562)

Abstract

This paper presents part of the data collection efforts undergone within the project COMPANIONS whose aim is to develop a set of dialogue systems that will be able to act as an artificial “companions” for human users. One of these systems, being developed in Czech language, is designed to be a partner of elderly people which will be able to talk with them about the photographs that capture mostly their family memories. The paper describes in detail the collection of natural dialogues using the Wizard of Oz scenario and also the re-use of the collected data for the creation of the expressive speech corpus that is planned for the development of the limited-domain Czech expressive TTS system.

Keywords

data collection corpus recording expressive speech synthesis dialogue system 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Grůber
    • 1
  • Milan Legát
    • 1
  • Pavel Ircing
    • 1
  • Jan Romportl
    • 1
  • Josef Psutka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cybernetics, Faculty of Applied SciencesUniversity of West BohemiaCzech Republic

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