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Concluding Remarks

  • Markku SuksiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

There is an institutional category of organizations that can be defined as territorial autonomy on the basis of certain institutional and material criteria. The absence of a supremacy clause or a preemption doctrine is one component of the definition. A distinction between territorial autonomies and federations can be made, so, too, a distinction between territorial autonomy and administrative forms of self-government. The current cases of sub-state entities examined can be arranged in relation to the Memel Territory in a manner that indicates that, for instance, Hong Kong and the Åland Islands conform best with the typical territorial autonomy, while Puerto Rico and Aceh should probably not be understood as belonging to territorial autonomies proper.

Keywords

Legislative Power Autonomous Entity Residual Power Union Republic Intergovernmental Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of LawAbo Akademi UniversityÅboFinland

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