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International Relations

  • Markku SuksiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Although the Memel case is relevant for other elements of territorial autonomy, it actually arose on the basis of contacts that the government of Memel made directly with a government of a third state. The PCIJ held that this was ultra vires and indicated at the same time one material area which seems to be of constant importance in the sub-state context, namely the possibility of the territorial autonomy to engage in international relations. A partial international legal capacity granted to the sub-state entity under the auspices of the State is possible, but in most cases, States seem to be protective of their sovereignty and restrict the sub-state entity in this respect. However, sub-state entities may have possibilities to influence the creation of international obligations of the State or to affect the implementation of an international obligation in their particular jurisdictions.

Keywords

International Relation International Maritime Organisation Special Administrative Region Foreign Relation International Obligation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of LawAbo Akademi UniversityÅboFinland

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