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Participation in Decision-Making

  • Markku SuksiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Territorial autonomy, as sub-state arrangements in general, is an organizational framework that facilitates participation, because the powers that a sub-state entity has been vested with have to be managed in a decision-making structure that fulfils the ordinary requirements of legitimacy. Elections are therefore presupposed as a participatory mechanism. As a consequence, sub-state entities often display a party structure which is different from that of the rest of the state. The referendum does not have any significant role in regular decision-making in sub-state entities, but certain fundamental decisions of a constitutional nature may sometimes be made by direct popular vote, such as the creation of the sub-state arrangement and changes of its basic features. Some sub-state entities also provide for more atypical forms of participation.

Keywords

Political Party Electoral System Legislative Council Universal Suffrage Gubernatorial Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of LawAbo Akademi UniversityÅboFinland

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