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The Distribution of Powers

  • Markku SuksiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The powers that a sub-state entity has is examined from the point of view of the enumerated and residual nature of the powers that the sub-state entity has, on the one hand, and the state has, on the other. The exclusive nature of the law-making powers accorded to the sub-state entity indicates that the entity is truly autonomous (Hong Kong, the Åland Islands, Zanzibar). These entities are not affected by any supremacy clause or preemption principle. Some other entities are vested with regulatory powers of a more administrative kind or at least clearly subordinated to the national law-maker (Aceh, Puerto Rico). In the latter case, the positioning of the entity amongst the territorial autonomies may be called into question.

Keywords

Legal Order Legislative Power United Republic Residual Power Joint Declaration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of LawAbo Akademi UniversityÅboFinland

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