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Formation and Stability of Calcium Oxalates, the Main Crystalline Phases of Kidney Stones

  • Alina R. Izatulina
  • Yurii O. Punin
  • Alexandr G. Shtukenberg
  • Olga V. Frank-Kamenetskaya
  • Vladislav V. Gurzhiy
Chapter

Abstract

Wide spread of oxalate mineralization in living organisms is a strong reason for its intense worldwide study during recent decades. Calcium oxalates can be found in human body (stones of urinary system, calcifications in lungs, crystals in a bone marrow etc.) (Socol et al. 2003; Zuzuk2005; Korago1992), in body of animals (stones of cats urinary system), and in plants (Korago 1992). Most often calcium oxalates occur as a part of pathogenic formations of the human urinary system (Korago 1992). The part of oxalate kidney stones ranges from50%to 75%depending of the geographical region. Our collection of kidney stones that were removed in Saint-Petersburg hospitals includes 263 samples, 81% of which consists of calcium oxalate minerals fully or as a part.

Keywords

Kidney Stone Calcium Oxalate Physiological Solution Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant # 10-05-00881-a)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alina R. Izatulina
    • 1
  • Yurii O. Punin
    • 1
  • Alexandr G. Shtukenberg
    • 1
  • Olga V. Frank-Kamenetskaya
    • 1
  • Vladislav V. Gurzhiy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CrystallographySaint Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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