Dynamic Simulation of Community Crime and Crime-Reporting Behavior

  • Michael A. Yonas
  • Jeffrey D. Borrebach
  • Jessica G. Burke
  • Shawn T. Brown
  • Katherine D. Philp
  • Donald S. Burke
  • John J. Grefenstette
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6589)

Abstract

An agent-based model was developed to explore the effectiveness of possible interventions to reduce neighborhood crime and violence. Both offenders and non-offenders (or citizens) were modeled as agents living in neighborhoods, with a set of rules controlling changes in behavior based on individual experience. Offenders may become more or less inclined to actively commit criminal offenses, depending on the behavior of the neighborhood residents and other nearby offenders, and on their arrest experience. In turn, citizens may become more or less inclined to report crimes, based on the observed prevalence of criminal activity within their neighborhood. This paper describes the basic design and dynamics of the model, and how such models might be used to investigate practical crime intervention programs.

Keywords

computer simulation agent-based model neighborhood violence crime prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael A. Yonas
    • 1
  • Jeffrey D. Borrebach
    • 1
  • Jessica G. Burke
    • 1
  • Shawn T. Brown
    • 1
  • Katherine D. Philp
    • 1
  • Donald S. Burke
    • 1
  • John J. Grefenstette
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Public HealthUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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