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Gas Source Tracing with a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy

  • Achim Lilienthal
  • Denis Reimann
  • Andreas Zell
Part of the Informatik aktuell book series (INFORMAT)

Abstract

As a sub-task of the general gas source localisation problem, gas souree tracing is supposed to guide a gas-sensitive mobile system towards a souree by using the cues determined from the gas distribution sensed along a driven path. This paper reports on an investigation of a biologically inspired gas source tracing strategy. Similar to the behaviour of the silkworm moth Bambyx mori, the implemented behaviour consists of a fixed motion pattern that realises a local search, and a meehanism that (re-)starts this motion pattern if an increased gas concentration is sensed. While the moth uses the local airftow direction to orient the motion pattern, this is not possible for a mobile robot due to the detection limits of eurrently available anemometers. Thus, an alternative method was implemented that uses an asymmetric motion pattern, which is biased towards the side where higher gas sensor readings were obtained. The adaptated strategy was implemented and tested on an experimental platform. This paper describes the strategy and evaluates its performance in terms of the ability to drive the robot towards a gas souree and to keep it within close proximity of the source.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Achim Lilienthal
    • 1
  • Denis Reimann
    • 1
  • Andreas Zell
    • 1
  1. 1.WSIUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany

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