Regulating Complexity: Policies for the Governance of Non-timber Forest Products

  • Sarah A. Laird
  • Rachel Wynberg
  • Rebecca J. McLain
Chapter
Part of the Tropical Forestry book series (TROPICAL, volume 7)

Abstract

Products from the wild, also known as non-timber forest products (NTFPs), are used as medicines, foods, spices, fibers, and fuel and for a multitude of other purposes. They contribute substantially to rural livelihoods and generate revenue for companies and governments, and their use has a range of impacts on biodiversity conservation. However, throughout the world, NTFPs have been both overlooked and poorly regulated by governments. Inappropriate policies have not only led to over-exploitation but also generated new forms of inequity. Drawing upon cases from around the world, this chapter reviews these experiences and provides information to support new policy approaches toward NTFP regulation and the broader issues of governance associated with these products.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This chapter draws from an edited volume titled Wild Product Governance: finding policies that work for non-timber forest products, edited by Sarah A. Laird, Rebecca J. McLain and Rachel P. Wynberg, and published by Earthscan in 2010 (http://www.peopleandplants.org). We are grateful to the contributors of that book for providing rich material from which to develop a synthesis. Financial and institutional support was provided by People and Plants International, the Environmental Evaluation Unit (University of Cape Town), the Institute for Culture and Ecology, the United Nations University and the Center for International Forestry Research. The Christensen Fund also provided invaluable support to the research and writing process. Additional financial support was given to Rachel Wynberg by South Africa’s National Research Foundation (NRF) although any opinion or findings expressed in this book are those of the authors alone.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah A. Laird
    • 1
  • Rachel Wynberg
    • 2
  • Rebecca J. McLain
    • 3
  1. 1.People and Plants InternationalBristolUSA
  2. 2.Environmental Evaluation UnitUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa
  3. 3.Institute for Culture and EcologyPortlandUSA

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