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EU Strategies for Climate Change Policy Beyond 2012

  • Christian EgenhoferEmail author
  • Arno Behrens
  • Anton Georgiev
Chapter
Part of the Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace book series (HSHES, volume 5)

Abstract

As early as 1996, the European Union (EU) adopted a long-term target of limiting global temperature increase to a maximum of two degrees Celsius (Egenhofer/ van Schaik 2005: 2–3) above pre-industrial levels. This was reiterated over the years, most recently in the European Council of 18–19 June 2009 (European Council 2009: 11). According to the European Commission (2009a: 3) – making reference to the 4th Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2007, 2007a, 2007b, 2007c, 2007d) – this would require developed countries to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 25–40 per cent by 2020 and 80–95 per cent by 2050 compared to 1990 levels. At the same time, developing countries would need to limit emissions growth to 15–30 per cent below baseline by 2020 (European Commission 2009a: 5). The tool to achieve this are the so-called Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) mentioned in the Bali Action Plan of December 2007 (UNFCCC 2007a: 3)

Keywords

European Union Member State Clean Development Mechanism Emission Trading Scheme Climate Change Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Egenhofer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Arno Behrens
    • 1
  • Anton Georgiev
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS)BrusselsBelgium

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