A Model of Biological Attacks on a Realistic Population

  • Kathleen M. Carley
  • Douglas Fridsma
  • Elizabeth Casman
  • Neal Altman
  • Li-Chiou Chen
  • Boris Kaminsky
  • Demian Nave
  • Alex Yahja
Conference paper

Abstract

The capability to assess the impacts of large-scale biological attacks and the efficacy of containment policies is critical and requires knowledge-intensive reasoning about social response and disease transmission within a complex social system. There is a close linkage among social networks, transportation networks, disease spread, and early detection. Spatial dimensions related to public gathering places such as hospitals, nursing homes, and restaurants, can play a major role in epidemics [Klovdahl et. al. 2001]. Like natural epidemics, bioterrorist attacks unfold within spatially defined, complex social systems, and the societal and networked response can have profound effects on their outcome. This paper focuses on bioterrorist attacks, but the model has been applied to emergent and familiar diseases as well.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen M. Carley
    • 1
  • Douglas Fridsma
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Casman
    • 1
  • Neal Altman
    • 1
  • Li-Chiou Chen
    • 1
  • Boris Kaminsky
    • 3
  • Demian Nave
    • 3
  • Alex Yahja
    • 1
  1. 1.Carnegie Mellon UniversityUSA
  2. 2.University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterUSA
  3. 3.Pittsburgh Supercomputing CenterUSA

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