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Enhancing the Expressiveness of Fingers: Multi-touch Ring Menus for Everyday Applications

  • Dietrich Kammer
  • Frank Lamack
  • Rainer Groh
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6439)

Abstract

In the future, environments equipped with interaction surfaces sensitive to touch input will be a key factor to enable ambient intelligence. The user’s fingers become input devices, allowing simple and intuitive interaction, like the manipulation of digital objects. However, people are used to everyday applications offering a wide variety of menu choices. We evaluate ring menus to enhance the expressiveness of finger interaction on multi-touch devices. Applicability and limits of ring menus are discussed with regard to our implementation by means of a preliminary user study.

Keywords

Multi-touch ring menus pie menus user interface design 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietrich Kammer
    • 1
  • Frank Lamack
    • 2
  • Rainer Groh
    • 1
  1. 1.Fakultät Informatik, Professur MediengestaltungTechnische Universität DresdenDresdenGermany
  2. 2.T-Systems Multimedia SolutionsDresdenGermany

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