A Comprehensive Taxonomy of Human Motives: A Principled Basis for the Motives of Intelligent Agents

  • Stephen J. Read
  • Jennifer Talevich
  • David A. Walsh
  • Gurveen Chopra
  • Ravi Iyer
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6356)

Abstract

We present a hierarchical taxonomy of human motives, based on similarity judgments of 161 motives gleaned from an extensive review of the motivation literature from McDougall to the present. This taxonomy provides a theoretically and empirically principled basis for the motive structures of Intelligent Agents. 220 participants sorted the motives into groups, using a Flash interface in a standard web browser. The co-occurrence matrix was cluster analyzed. At the broadest level were five large clusters concerned with Relatedness, Competence, Morality and Religion, Self-enhancement / Self-knowledge, and Avoidance. Each of the broad clusters divided into more specific motives. We discuss using this taxonomy as the basis for motives in Intelligent Agents, as well as its relationship to other motive organizations.

Keywords

Human goals human motives motive taxonomy motivation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. Read
    • 1
  • Jennifer Talevich
    • 1
  • David A. Walsh
    • 1
  • Gurveen Chopra
    • 1
  • Ravi Iyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos Angeles

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