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Abstract

Patch antenna arrays are used extensively due to their low profile structure, light weight and low cost. Patch antenna arrays have been widely used for a variety of wireless applications. However, a major drawback of this type of antenna arrays is mutual coupling and bandwidth. Mutual Coupling losses can be reduced effectively by placing Electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, also called photonic band gap (PBG) structures. In this paper, different types of Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG) structures are proposed to be placed in between the patch antenna arrays to reduce the mutual coupling loss. These EBG structures are designed as small as possible because of system compactness. Hence the design of novel compact hybrid EBG structures are more challenging for wireless applications. In this paper various hybrid EBG structures showed with and without vias are compared with the defined antenna parameters.

Keywords

EBG structures patch antenna arrays mutual coupling loss structure realization band pass stop band compact size bandwidth vias 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Bhuvaneswari
    • 1
  • K. Malathi
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Scholar, Dept. of Electronics and Commn Engg2 CEG, Anna University, Chennai – 25, Meenakshi College of EngineeringChennai
  2. 2.Dept. of Electronics and Commn Engg, CEGAnna UniversityChennai

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