A Rule-Based Acquisition Model Adapted for Morphological Analysis

  • Constantine Lignos
  • Erwin Chan
  • Mitchell P. Marcus
  • Charles Yang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6241)

Abstract

We adapt the cognitively-oriented morphology acquisition model proposed in (Chan 2008) to perform morphological analysis, extending its concept of base-derived relationships to allow multi-step derivations and adding features required for robustness on noisy corpora. This results in a rule-based morphological analyzer which attains an F-score of 58.48% in English and 33.61% in German in the Morpho Challenge 2009 Competition 1 evaluation. The learner’s performance shows that acquisition models can effectively be used in text-processing tasks traditionally dominated by statistical approaches.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Constantine Lignos
    • 1
  • Erwin Chan
    • 2
  • Mitchell P. Marcus
    • 1
  • Charles Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaUSA
  2. 2.University of ArizonaUSA

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