Bridging Multiple Motor-Skills in a Community Site

  • Kenji Matsuura
  • Naka Gotoda
  • Tetsushi Ueta
  • Yoneo Yano
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6279)

Abstract

This paper touches upon the design issue for multiple skill development of human beings in an online community environment. It focuses on motor skills such as rope-skipping, running, swimming and so forth in the physical world. The approach attempts to adopt social networking service for mutual contribution on that purpose as the base of online communication. In order to treat various sorts of skill, the web-based system allows community authors to handle several types of media for storing records of skill training of individuals and representing them in the system. This study developed such an environment and made trial use for the first stage.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Higgins, S.: Motor Skill Acquisition. Physical Therapy 71, 123–139 (1991)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bansler, J.P., Havn, E.C.: Sharing best practices: An Empirical Study of IT-Support for Knowledge Sharing. In: Proceedings of The 9th European Conference on Information Systems, pp. 653–664 (2001)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fischer, G., Rohde, M., Wulf, V.: Community-based learning: The core competency of residential, research-based universities. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning 2(1), 9–40 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wenger, E., White, N., Smith, J.D.: Digital Habitats, CPsquare (2009)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gentile, A.M.: Skill acquisition: Action, movement, and neuromotor processes. In: Carr, J.H., Shepherd, R.B. (eds.) Movement Science: Foundations for Physical Therapy in Rehabilitation, pp. 111–187 (2000)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Allard, F., Starkes, J.L.: Motor-skill experts in sports, dance, and other domains. In: Ericsson, K.A., Smith, J. (eds.) Toward a General Theory of Expertise, pp. 126–150. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1991)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hollan, E., Hutchings, E., Kirsh, D.: Distributed cognition: toward a new foundation for human-computer interaction research. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7(2), 174–196 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Fischer, G.: Communities of Interest: Learning through the Interaction of Multiple Knowledge Systems. In: Proceedings of the 24th IRIS Conference, pp. 1–14 (2001)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Matsuura
    • 1
  • Naka Gotoda
    • 2
  • Tetsushi Ueta
    • 1
  • Yoneo Yano
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Information TechnologyThe University of TokushimaTokushimaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of EngineeringThe University of TokushimaTokushimaJapan

Personalised recommendations