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Introduction to Linear Waves

  • Kolumban HutterEmail author
  • Yongqi Wang
  • Irina P. Chubarenko
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics book series (AGEM)

Abstract

Waves in open waters, such as the ocean, lakes, channels, arise in a variety of forms and types and have various physical reasons for their formation. We will have the occasion in a number of subsequent chapters (in volume 2) to investigate the important types of waves in the geophysical context as they apply to lakes, the ocean and, to limited extent, also to the atmosphere.

Keywords

Dispersion Relation Standing Wave Surface Elevation Particle Trajectory Phase Speed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kolumban Hutter
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yongqi Wang
    • 2
  • Irina P. Chubarenko
    • 3
  1. 1.ETH Zürich, c/o Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau Hydrologie und GlaziologieZürichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringDarmstadt University of TechnologyDarmstadtGermany
  3. 3.Russian Academy of Sciences, P.P. Shirshov Institute of OceanologyKaliningradRussia

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