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Opportunities and Constraints for Climate Adaptation in Regional Water and Land Use Planning

  • Saskia E. Werners
  • Jennifer West
  • Rik Leemans
  • J. David Tàbara
  • Xingang Dai
  • Zsuzsanna Flachner
  • Francesc Cots
  • Henry Neufeldt
  • Darryn McEvoy
  • Giacomo Trombi
Conference paper
Part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM)

Abstract

Whereas the literature on adaptation is rich in detail on the impacts of, vulnerability to, and constraints of climate adaptation, less is known about the conditions that facilitate adaptation in practice. We examined the constraints and opportunities for adaptation in water and land use planning in three regions: the Guadiana River Basin in Spain and Portugal, the Tisza River Basin in Hungary and western Inner Mongolia in China. We analysed the conditions that either facilitate or constrain adaptation in relation to (1) adaptation actors, (2) adaptation strategies, and (3) adaptation objectives. Many adaptation assessments concentrate on climate impacts and the potential of adaptation strategies. The conditions that enable people to act on adaptation are less studied. Yet these have been identified as particularly important for successfully implementing adaptation. We find that adaptation is enhanced by pilot projects that test and debate new ideas through collaboration between recognized actors from civil society, policy, and science. Promising for adaptation is the integration of (traditional) agro-environmental land use systems that regulate regional climate impacts with new technologies, organizational responsibilities and financial instruments. A key challenge is to create flexible and equitable financial instruments that facilitate benefit and burden sharing, social learning, and that support a diverse set of potentially better adapted new activities rather than compensate for climate impacts on existing activities.

Keywords

Adaptation assessment China Climate adaptation Europe Hungary Land use management Portugal Regional water and land use planning Spain Water management 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Work on this paper has been supported by a grant from the European Commission through the European research project ADAM (Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies: Supporting European climate policy, Contract No. 018476-GOCE, http://www.adamproject.eu) and from the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Conservation, and Food Quality. We thank all interviewees and participants of the regional workshops for sharing their experience on adaptation practice. We are grateful for the valuable comments and help of research partners, especially Helene Amundsen, Marco Bindi, Maria Falaleeva, C. Fu, Zsolt Harnos, Alex Haxeltine, Levente Horváth, Mike Hulme, Francesca Incerti, Gensuo Jia, Márton Jolánkai, Marco Moriondo, István Lang, Rik Leemans, Hongtao Liu, Lorenzo Orioli, Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anna Serra, Yanling Sun, Rob Swart, Y. Xu, and L. You.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saskia E. Werners
    • 1
  • Jennifer West
    • 1
  • Rik Leemans
    • 1
  • J. David Tàbara
    • 1
  • Xingang Dai
    • 1
  • Zsuzsanna Flachner
    • 1
  • Francesc Cots
    • 1
  • Henry Neufeldt
    • 1
  • Darryn McEvoy
    • 1
  • Giacomo Trombi
    • 1
  1. 1.Earth System Science – Climate Change GroupWageningen University and Research CentreWageningenThe Netherlands

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