Efficient Fuzzy Matching and Intersection on Private Datasets

  • Qingsong Ye
  • Ron Steinfeld
  • Josef Pieprzyk
  • Huaxiong Wang
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-14423-3_15

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5984)
Cite this paper as:
Ye Q., Steinfeld R., Pieprzyk J., Wang H. (2010) Efficient Fuzzy Matching and Intersection on Private Datasets. In: Lee D., Hong S. (eds) Information, Security and Cryptology – ICISC 2009. ICISC 2009. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 5984. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

At Eurocrypt’04, Freedman, Nissim and Pinkas introduced a fuzzy private matching problem. The problem is defined as follows. Given two parties, each of them having a set of vectors where each vector has T integer components, the fuzzy private matching is to securely test if each vector of one set matches any vector of another set for at least t components where t < T. In the conclusion of their paper, they asked whether it was possible to design a fuzzy private matching protocol without incurring a communication complexity with the factor \(T \choose t\). We answer their question in the affirmative by presenting a protocol based on homomorphic encryption, combined with the novel notion of a share-hiding error-correcting secret sharing scheme, which we show how to implement with efficient decoding using interleaved Reed-Solomon codes. This scheme may be of independent interest. Our protocol is provably secure against passive adversaries, and has better efficiency than previous protocols for certain parameter values.

Keywords

Private matching private set intersection fuzzy private matching homomorphic encryption error correction secret sharing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qingsong Ye
    • 1
  • Ron Steinfeld
    • 1
  • Josef Pieprzyk
    • 1
  • Huaxiong Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Advanced Computing – Algorithms and Cryptography, Department of ComputingMacquarie UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Division of Mathematical Sciences, School of Physical and Mathematical SciencesNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

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