Open Learner Models

  • Susan Bull
  • Judy Kay
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 308)

Abstract

An Open Learner Model makes a machines’ representation of the learner available as an important means of support for learning. This means that a suitable interface is created for use by learners, and in some cases for others who aid their learning, including peers, parents and teachers. The chapter describes the range of purposes that Open Learner Models can serve, illustrating these with diverse examples of the ways that they have been made available in several research systems. We then discuss the closely related issues of openness and learner control and the ways that have been explored to support learning by making the learner model available to people other than the learner. This chapter provides a foundation for understanding the range of ways that Open Learner Models have already been used to support learning as well as directions yet to be explored.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Bull
    • 1
  • Judy Kay
    • 2
  1. 1.Electronic, Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of BirminghamUK
  2. 2.School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of SydneyAustralia

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