A Turing-Like Handshake Test for Motor Intelligence

  • Amir Karniel
  • Ilana Nisky
  • Guy Avraham
  • Bat-Chen Peles
  • Shelly Levy-Tzedek
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6191)

Abstract

In the Turing test, a computer model is deemed to “think intelligently” if it can generate answers that are not distinguishable from those of a human. This test is limited to the linguistic aspects of machine intelligence. A salient function of the brain is the control of movement, with the human hand movement being a sophisticated demonstration of this function. Therefore, we propose a Turing-like handshake test, for machine motor intelligence. We administer the test through a telerobotic system in which the interrogator is engaged in a task of holding a robotic stylus and interacting with another party (human, artificial, or a linear combination of the two). Instead of asking the interrogator whether the other party is a person or a computer program, we employ a forced-choice method and ask which of two systems is more human-like. By comparing a given model with a weighted sum of human and artificial systems, we fit a psychometric curve to the answers of the interrogator and extract a quantitative measure for the computer model in terms of similarity to the human handshake.

Keywords

Turing test Human Machine Interface Haptics Teleoperation Motor Control Motor Behavior Diagnostics Perception Rhythmic Discrete 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amir Karniel
    • 1
  • Ilana Nisky
    • 1
  • Guy Avraham
    • 1
  • Bat-Chen Peles
    • 1
  • Shelly Levy-Tzedek
    • 1
  1. 1.The Computational Motor control Laboratory, Department of Biomedical EngineeringBen-Gurion University of the NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael

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