Inductive Generalization of Analytically Learned Goal Hierarchies

  • Tolga Könik
  • Negin Nejati
  • Ugur Kuter
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-13840-9_7

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5989)
Cite this paper as:
Könik T., Nejati N., Kuter U. (2010) Inductive Generalization of Analytically Learned Goal Hierarchies. In: De Raedt L. (eds) Inductive Logic Programming. ILP 2009. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 5989. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

We describe a new approach for learning procedural knowledge represented as teleoreactive logic programs using relational behavior traces as input. This representation organizes task decomposition skills hierarchically and associate explicitly defined goals with them. Our approach integrates analytical learning with inductive generalization in order to learn these skills. The analytical component predicts the goal dependencies in a successful solution and generates a teleoreactive logic program that can solve similar problems by determining the structure of the skill hierarchy and skill applicability conditions (preconditions), which may be overgeneral. The inductive component experiments with these skills on new problems and uses the data collected in this process to refine the preconditions. Our system achieves this by converting the data collected during the problem solving experiments into the positive and negative examples of preconditions that can be learned with a standard Inductive Logic Programming system. We show that this conversion uses one of the main commitments of teleoreactive logic programs: associating all skills with explicitly defined goals. We claim that our approach uses less expert effort compared to a purely inductive approach and performs better compared to a purely analytical approach.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tolga Könik
    • 1
  • Negin Nejati
    • 1
  • Ugur Kuter
    • 2
  1. 1.Computational Learning LaboratoryStanford UniversityStanford
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science and Institute for Advanced Computer StudiesUniversity of MarylandCollege Park

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