Human Perception in Segmentation of Sketches

  • Pedro Company
  • Peter A. C. Varley
  • Ana Piquer
  • Margarita Vergara
  • Jaime Sánchez-Rubio
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6020)

Abstract

In this paper, we study the segmentation of sketched engineering drawings into a set of straight and curved segments. Our immediate objective is to produce a benchmarking method for segmentation algorithms. The criterion is to minimise the differences between what the algorithm detects and what human beings perceive. We have created a set of sketched drawings and have asked people to segment them. By analysis of the produced segmentations, we have obtained the number and locations of the segmentation points which people perceive. Evidence collected during our experiments supports useful hypotheses, for example that not all kinds of segmentation points are equally difficult to perceive. The resulting methodology can be repeated with other drawings to obtain a set of sketches and segmentation data which could be used as a benchmark for segmentation algorithms, to evaluate their capability to emulate human perception of sketches.

Keywords

Sketch recognition Low level ink processing and pen stroke segmentation Engineering Graphics Segmentation Ability 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Company
    • 1
  • Peter A. C. Varley
    • 1
  • Ana Piquer
    • 1
  • Margarita Vergara
    • 1
  • Jaime Sánchez-Rubio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and ConstructionUniversitat Jaume ICastellonSpain

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