An Ideal Customer: A Grounded Theory of Requirements Elicitation, Communication and Acceptance on Agile Projects

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the reality of the customer role – a critical, complex, and demanding role on agile teams. Despite initial difficulties, customers love agile development and would not do it any other way, but they also encountered many difficulties in their day-to-day work. In this chapter we describe the practices that have emerged to ensure the role works effectively and sustainably, and how the role has evolved from an individual to a team. We hope customers will find this chapter helpful in performing their role, and programmers will find it useful to understand the complexities of customer’s role on the project.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beavers, P. A. (2007). Managing a Large "Agile" Software Engineering Organization. Agile 2007, Washington D.C, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  2. Beck, K. (2000). eXtreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change, Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  3. Beck, K. (2004). eXtreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change. Second Edition., Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  4. Beck, K., M. Beedle, et al. (2001). "Manifesto for Agile Software Development". from http://agilemanifesto.org/.
  5. Beck, K. and M. Fowler (2001). Planning Extreme Programming, Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  6. Beyer, H., K. Holtzblatt, et al. (2004). An Agile Customer-Centered Method: Rapid Contextual Design. XP Agile Universe, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Google Scholar
  7. Broschinsky, D. and L. Baker (2008). Using Persona with XP at LANDesk Software, an Avocent Company. Agile 2008, Toronto, Canada, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  8. DeMarco, T. (1979). Structured Analysis and System Specification, Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  9. Fitzgerald, B. (2000). "Systems Development Methodologies: The Problem of Tenses". Information Technology and People 13(3): 174 - 185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Fuqua, A. M. and J. M. Hammer (2003). Embracing Change: An XP Experience Report. Fourth Internal Conference on Extreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering, Genoa, Italy, Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  11. Ganis, M., D. Leip, et al. (2005). Introducing Agile Development (XP) into a Corporate Webmaster Environment - An Experience Report. Agile 2005, Denver, Colorado, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  12. Glaser, B. G. (1978). Theoretical Sensitivity: Advances in the Methodology of Grounded Theory., The Sociology Press.Google Scholar
  13. Glaser, B. G. and A. L. Strauss (1967). The Discovery of Grounded Theory: Strategies for Qualitative Research. Chicago: Aldine.Google Scholar
  14. Gottesdiener, E. (2002). Requirements by Collaboration: Workshops for Defining Needs, Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  15. Highsmith, J. (2000). Adaptive Software Development: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Complex Systems., Dorset House Publishing.Google Scholar
  16. Hodgetts, P. (2004). Refactoring the Development Process: Experiences with the Incremental Adoption of Agile Processes. Agile Development Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  17. Honious, J. and J. Clark (2006). Something to Believe In. Agile 2006, Minneapolis, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  18. Hussman, D. (2003). Coaching a Customer Team. Fourth Internal Conference on Extreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering, Genoa, Italy, Springer- Verlag.Google Scholar
  19. Isham, M. (2008). Agile Architecture is Possible - You First Have to Believe. Agile 2008, Toronto, Canada, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  20. Kahkonen, T. (2004). Agile Methods for Large Organisations - Building Communities of Practice. Agile Development Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  21. Lowery, M. and M. Evans (2007). Scaling Product Ownership. Agile 2007, Washington D.C, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  22. Mackinnon, T. (2003). XP - Call in the Social Workers. Fourth International Conference on eXtreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering., Genoa, Italy, Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  23. Manns, M. L. and L. Rising (2004). Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas, Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  24. Martin, A. (2009). Exploring the Role of Customers in Extreme Programming Projects. PhD Thesis. New Zealand. http://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/handle/10063/877, Victoria University of Wellington. PhD: 150.
  25. Martin, A., R. Biddle, et al. (2009). The XP Customer Team: A Grounded Theory. Agile 2009, Chicago, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  26. Martin, A., R. Biddle, et al. (2009). XP Customer Practices: A Grounded Theory. Agile 2009, Chicago, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  27. Merholz, P., T. Wilkens, et al. (2008). Subject To Change: Creating Great Products and Services for an Uncertain World, O'Reilly.Google Scholar
  28. Miller, L. (2005). Case Study of Customer Input for a Sucessful Product. Agile 2005, Denver, Colorado, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  29. Nandhakumar, J. and D. E. Avison (1999). "The Fiction of Methodological Development: A Field Study of Information Systems Development". Information Technology and People 12(2): 1 - 28.Google Scholar
  30. Rasmusson, J. (2006). Agile Project Initiation Techniques - The Inception Deck and Boot Camp. Agile 2006, Minneapolis, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  31. ResearchWare (2006). HyperResearch Qualitative Analysis Tool.Google Scholar
  32. Schwaber, K. and M. Beedle (2001). Agile Software Development with Scrum, Prentice- Hall.Google Scholar
  33. Takats, A. and N. Brewer (2005). Improving Communication between Customers and Developers. Agile 2005, Denver, Colorado, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar
  34. Weyrauch, K. (2006). What Are We Arguing About? A Framework for Defining Agile in our Organization. Agile 2006, Minneapolis, United States, IEEE Computer Society.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceThe University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.School of Computer ScienceCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  3. 3.School of Engineering and Computer ScienceVictoria UniversityWellingtonNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations