New Event-Processing Design Patterns Using CEP

  • Alexandre de Castro Alves
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 43)

Abstract

Complex Event Processing (CEP) is a powerful technology for supporting advanced event-processing scenarios at a higher level of abstraction. Because of its expressiveness, CEP allows prompt creation and classification of new event-processing design patterns, some of which have been implemented in the past in a non-reusable form. This paper documents a set of new patterns for event processing, describing their problem domain and providing a solution template implemented using CEP, which is both succinct and highly re-usable.

Keywords

CEP stream management stream processing SQL CQL design pattern 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Luckham, D.: The Power of Events, An Introduction to Complex Event Processing in Distributed Enterprise Systems (2002)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gamma, E., Helm, R., Johnson, R., Vlissides, J.: Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software (1995)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Arasu, A., Babcock, B., Babu, S., Cieslewicz, J., Datar, M., Ito, K., Motwani, R., Srivastava, U., Widom, J.: STREAM: The Stanford Data Stream Management System (2004)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Schulte, R., Bradely, A.: A Gartner Reference Architecture for Event Processing Networks, ID G00162454 (2009)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Etzion, O.: EDA Conceptual Model (work in progress) IBM. In: 3rd EPTS Event Processing Symposium, Orlando (September 2007)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Luckham, D., Schulte, R.: Event Processing Glossary Version 1.1 (2008)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Arasu, A., Babu, S., Widom, J.: The CQL Continuous Query Language: Semantic Foundations and Query Execution. Technical report, Stanford University (October 2003), http://dbpubs.stanford.edu/pub/2003-67
  8. 8.
    Srivastava, U., Widom, J.: Flexible time management in data stream systems. In: Proc. of the 23rd ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems (June 2004)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    White, S., Alves, A., Rorke, D.: WebLogic event server: a lightweight, modular application server for event processing. In: Proceedings of the second international conference on Distributed event-based systems (2008)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Jain, N., Mishra, S., Srinivasan, A., Gehrke, J., Balakrishnan, H., Cetintemel, U., Cherniack, M., Tibbetts, R., Zdonik, S.: Towards a streaming SQL standard. In: Proceedings of the VLDB Endowment (2008)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Paschke, A.: Design Patterns for Complex Event Processing. In: Proceedings from Distributed Event-Based Systems Symposium (2008)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Tsimelzon, M.: Coral8 Design Patterns (2006), http://www.coral8.com/blogs/blog-entry/cep-design-patterns
  13. 13.
    Ammon, R., Silberbauer, C., Wolff, C.: Domain Specific Reference Models for Event Patterns (2007)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Paschke, A.: EuroPLop 2008 Focus Group on CEP Patterns and Rule Patterns, http://www.biotec.tu-dresden.de/~adrianp/europlop08_cep/EuroPLoP_CEP_Focus.pdf
  15. 15.
    Anonymous, Pattern matching in sequence of rows (2007), http://asktom.oracle.com/tkyte/row-pattern-recogniton-11-public.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandre de Castro Alves
    • 1
  1. 1.Oracle CorporationRedwood ShoresUSA

Personalised recommendations