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Plant Defense Signaling from the Underground Primes Aboveground Defenses to Confer Enhanced Resistance in a Cost-Efficient Manner

  • Marieke Van Hulten
  • Jurriaan Ton
  • Corné M. J. Pieterse
  • Saskia C. M. Van WeesEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Signaling and Communication in Plants book series (SIGCOMM)

Abstract

Plants can be induced to develop below and aboveground enhanced resistance to pathogens and herbivorous insects by root-colonizing beneficial micro-organisms. The resistance induced is broad-spectrum and can be long lasting. The enhanced resistance is based at least partially on priming of defense responses, leading to a more rapid or more intense mobilization of defense responses upon encounter with harmful organisms. Several molecular players in local and systemic tissues of plants treated with resistance-inducing microbes have been identified and are reviewed in this chapter. We also discuss the ecological consequences of expression of induced resistance through a primed defense response.

Keywords

Defense Response Jasmonic Acid Transcription Factor Gene Systemic Acquire Resistance PGPR Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marieke Van Hulten
    • 1
  • Jurriaan Ton
    • 1
  • Corné M. J. Pieterse
    • 1
  • Saskia C. M. Van Wees
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Faculty of Science, Plant–Microbe Interactions, Department of BiologyUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands

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