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Synthesis of Modeling and Simulation Methods on Critical Infrastructure Interdependencies Research

  • Gesara Satumtira
  • Leonardo Dueñas-Osorio

Abstract

National security, economic prosperity, and the quality of life of today’s societies depend on the continuous and reliable operation of interdependent infrastructures. Models to capture the performance and operation of these systems have been developed to support planning, maintenance, and retrofit decision making from multiple view points, including infrastructure owners or investors, private and public users, and government entities that ensure reliability, economic vitality and security. The study of interdependent infrastructures is challenging due to heterogeneous quality and insufficient data availability and the need to account for their spatial and temporal aspects of complex supply-demand operation. Research and implementation studies have attempted to address interdependence modeling through various techniques, such as Agent Based simulation, Input- Output Inoperability, system reliability theory, nonlinear dynamics, and graph theory. These studies are mainly targeted at understanding infrastructure behavior and response to disruptions through single modeling techniques. However, hybrid modeling techniques, multi-scale analyses, and other realizable innovative approaches are lacking, in part because few studies have characterized existing models into a single source to provide a current state of the field, elucidate connections across existing studies, and synthesize a directive for future research. This chapter introduces a conceptualization of current research that integrates the multiple ideas in the field of infrastructure interdependencies into a unified hierarchical structure that navigates through research advances from early papers in the1980’s to date. The body of knowledge is categorized according to several attributes identified in the field, such as mathematical method, modeling objective, scale of analysis, quality and quantity of input data, targeted discipline, and end user type. The hierarchical conceptualization approach synthesizes available data and is expected to ease the research and application process of interdependencies concepts by finding differences and commonalities in data collection, analyses techniques, and desired outputs. This research survey highlights that most of the existing interdependence modeling strategies are not competing but rather complementary approaches, which can provide a vehicle for immediate innovative studies on coupled infrastructures, such as stochastic interdependence, cascading failures across systems, and the establishment of risk mitigation principles. New linkages across existing research can facilitate implementation and dissemination of results, inform areas of data collection, enable benchmark models for validation predictions and model comparisons, and point to long term broader and emergent unresolved research issues in infrastructure interdependence research, possibly including smart technologies, bio-inspiration, sustainability, scalability of analysis algorithms, and dimension reduction of network abstractions.

Keywords

Complex Adaptive System Critical Infrastructure Infrastructure System Gross Regional Product Market Clearing Price 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gesara Satumtira
    • 1
  • Leonardo Dueñas-Osorio
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Civil and Environmental EngineeringRice UniversityHoustonUnited States

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