Advertisement

Participatory Simulation Environment gumonji/Q: A Network Game Empowered by Agents

  • Shohei Yamane
  • Shoichi Sawada
  • Hiromitsu Hattori
  • Marika Odagaki
  • Kengo Nakajima
  • Toru Ishida
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5925)

Abstract

Network games are attracting attention as simulation platforms for social experiments because of their rich visualization performance and scalability. Our objective in this study is to develop a participatory simulation platform on a network game. Unlike non player characters (NPCs) in network games, agents in a participatory multiagent-based simulation (PMAS) should behave as real-world humans according to behavior models. We developed a novel networked participatory simulation platform called gumonji/Q by integrating scenario description language Q with the network game gumonji. This paper details the implementation of gumonji/Q. In order to connect Q and gumonji, we implement communication sub-components that realize TCP/IP communication between them, and a scenario translator to convert a request from Q into a sequence of operators. This makes it possible for the gumonji simulator to deal with human-controlled avatars and Q-controlled agents in a unified way.

Keywords

Multiagent Simulation Simulation Platform Participatory Simulation Gaming Networked Simulator 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Gilbert, N., Maltby, S., Asakawa, T.: Participatory simulations for developing scenarios in environmental resource management. In: Third workshop on agent-based simulation, pp. 67–72 (2002)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Torii, D., Ishida, T., Bousquet, F.: Modeling agents and interactions in agricultural economics. In: Proceedings of the 5th International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2006), pp. 81–88 (2006)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Colella, V., Borovoy, R., Resnick, M.: Participatory simulations: using computational objects to learn about dynamic systems. In: CHI 1998: CHI 98 conference summary on Human factors in computing systems, pp. 9–10 (1998)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Murakami, Y., Sugimoto, Y., Ishida, T.: Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems. In: Proceedings of the 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI 2005), pp. 127–132 (2005)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ishida, T.: Q: A scenario description language for interactive agents. Computer 35(11), 42–47 (2002)CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Nakanishi, H., Ishida, T.: Freewalk/q: social interaction platform in virtual space. In: VRST 2004: Proceedings of the ACM symposium on Virtual reality software and technology, pp. 97–104 (2004)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bousquet, F., Bakam, I., Proton, H., Page, C.L.: Cormas: Common-pool resources and multi-agent systems. In: Mira, J., Moonis, A., de Pobil, A.P. (eds.) IEA/AIE 1998. LNCS, vol. 1416, pp. 826–837. Springer, Heidelberg (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Murakami, Y., Ishida, T., Kawasoe, T., Hishiyama, R.: Scenario description for multi-agent simulation. In: AAMAS 2003: Proceedings of the second international joint conference on Autonomous agents and multiagent systems, pp. 369–376 (2003)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Nakanishi, H., Nakazawa, S., Ishida, T., Takanashi, K., Isbister, K.: Can software agents influence human relations?: balance theory in agent-mediated communities. In: AAMAS 2003: Proceedings of the second international joint conference on Autonomous agents and multiagent systems, pp. 717–724 (2003)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ishida, T.: Society-Centered Design for Socially Embedded Multiagent Systems. Lecture notes in computer science, pp. 16–29 (2004)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shohei Yamane
    • 1
  • Shoichi Sawada
    • 1
  • Hiromitsu Hattori
    • 1
  • Marika Odagaki
    • 2
  • Kengo Nakajima
    • 2
  • Toru Ishida
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Community Engine Inc.TokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations