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A New SNA Centrality Measure Quantifying the Distance to the Nearest Center

  • Angela Bohn
  • Stefan Theußl
  • Ingo Feinerer
  • Kurt Hornik
  • Patrick Mair
  • Norbert Walchhofer
Conference paper
Part of the Studies in Classification, Data Analysis, and Knowledge Organization book series (STUDIES CLASS)

Abstract

In Social Network Analysis (SNA) centrality measures focus on activity (degree), information access (betweenness), distance to all the nodes (closeness), or popularity (pagerank). We introduce a new measure quantifying the distance of nodes to the network center. It is called weighted distance to nearest center (WDNC) and it is based on edge-weighted closeness (EWC), a weighted version of closeness. The WDNC will be tested on two e-mail networks of the R community, one of the most important open source programs for statistical computing and graphics. We will find that there is a relationship between the WDNC and the formal organization of the R community.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Bohn
    • 1
  • Stefan Theußl
  • Ingo Feinerer
  • Kurt Hornik
  • Patrick Mair
  • Norbert Walchhofer
  1. 1.Wirtschaftsuniversität WienWienAustria

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