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Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis, n. gen. n. sp., A New Abelisaurid Theropod from the Late Cretaceous of India

  • Fernando E. Novas
  • Sankar Chatterjee
  • Dhiraj K. Rudra
  • P.M. Datta
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences book series (LNEARTH, volume 132)

Abstract

Systematic excavations in the fluvial mudstone unit of the Upper Cretaceous Lameta Formation near Rahioli village in Kheda District, Gujarat, have yielded a large-bodied (~8 m long) abelisaurid theropod, Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis, gen. et sp. nov. Abundant skeletal remains represent this new genus and species. Rahiolisaurus provides novel information on foot morphology, hitherto little known in other abelisaurids. Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis is a gracile and slender-limbed abelisaurid that appears to be a distinctive taxon from the sympatric species Rajasaurus narmadensis.

Keywords

Ventral Margin Neural Arch Neural Spine Caudal Vertebra Glenoid Cavity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The palaeontological fieldwork in India was carried out in collaboration with Texas Tech University, the Indian Statistical Institute, and the Geological Survey of India. We thank the National Geographic Society, the Dinosaur Society, and the Smithsonian Institution for continued funding of the field projects in India and the Directors of the Indian Statistical Institute and the Geological Survey of India for logistical support. We thank D. Pradhan and Shyamal Roy for field assistance, the Indian Statistical Institute and the Geological Survey of India for access to the theropod collections. We thank Catherine Forster, Dave Krause, José Bonaparte, Alejandro Kramarz, Jorge Calvo and Rodolfo Coria for access to specimens under their care, Jorge González and Jeff Martz for illustrations, and Bill Mueller for photography. Thanks are given to Bill Mueller, Jeff Wilson, Sara Burch, Dave Krause, Matt Carrano and Saswati Bandyopadhyay for their useful comments on the manuscript. Texas Tech University, Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Técnica, CONICET, Fundación Antorchas, National Geographic Society, and The Jurassic Foundation supported the research.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fernando E. Novas
    • 1
  • Sankar Chatterjee
    • 2
  • Dhiraj K. Rudra
    • 3
  • P.M. Datta
    • 4
  1. 1.Conicet, Museo Argentino de Ciencias NaturalesBuenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Department of GeosciencesMuseum of Texas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  3. 3.Geological Studies UnitIndian Statistical InstituteKolkataIndia
  4. 4.Paleontology DivisionGeological Survey of India, Eastern RegionKolkataIndia

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