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Erroneous Examples: A Preliminary Investigation into Learning Benefits

  • Dimitra Tsovaltzi
  • Erica Melis
  • Bruce M. McLaren
  • Michael Dietrich
  • Georgi Goguadze
  • Ann-Kristin Meyer
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5794)

Abstract

In this work, we investigate the effect of presenting students with common errors of other students and explore whether such erroneous examples can help students learn without the embarrassment and demotivation of working with one’s own errors. The erroneous examples are presented to students by a technology enhanced learning (TEL) system. We discuss the theoretical background of learning with erroneous examples, describe our TEL setting, and discuss initial, small-scale studies we conducted to explore learning with erroneous examples.

Keywords

Error Detection Learning Orientation Cognitive Science Society Conceptual Question Technology Enhance Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dimitra Tsovaltzi
    • 1
  • Erica Melis
    • 1
  • Bruce M. McLaren
    • 1
  • Michael Dietrich
    • 2
  • Georgi Goguadze
    • 2
  • Ann-Kristin Meyer
    • 2
  1. 1.German Research Center for Artificial IntelligenceSaarbrückenGermany
  2. 2.Fachbereich InformatikUniversität des SaarlandesSaarbrückenGermany

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