Remediation Technologies for Contaminated Sites

  • Albert T. Yeung

Abstract

Contaminated sites can pose a significant risk to public health and the environment. Many different insitu or ex-situ remediation technologies have been developed throughout the years to mitigate the risk imposed by soil contamination. These technologies may be contaminant and site specific. Remediation can be achieved by contaminated soil removal, contaminant removal, containment, stabilization/solidification, transformation, or different combinations of these mechanisms. It may also be necessary to apply these technologies in combination to achieve remediation goals, in particular, for cases of contamination by multiple contaminants. Some of the remediation technologies currently available are presented in this invited lecture, in particular, the theory, state of development, applicability, limitations, remediation efficiency, cost effectiveness, and potential side effects of the remediation technologies are presented. Details of performance monitoring are described, criteria on selection of the appropriate remediation technology are given, and remediation cost estimate procedure is outlined. As innovative remediation technologies are being developed continuingly to satisfy various needs, the technologies presented in this invited lecture are by no means exhaustive. Nonetheless, a comprehensive list of references is given for readers interested in particular technologies to conduct their further exploration.

Keywords

contaminated sites remediation technologies performance monitoring selection of remediation technologies remediation cost estimate 

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Air Sparging / Soil Vapor Extraction

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Electrochemical Remediation

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Other Remediation Technologies

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Selection of Remediation Technologies

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Cost Estimate

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Copyright information

© Zhejiang University Press, Hangzhou and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert T. Yeung
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringThe University of Hong KongChina

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