Towards an Intelligent User Interface: Strategies of Giving and Receiving Phone Numbers

  • Tiit Hennoste
  • Olga Gerassimenko
  • Riina Kasterpalu
  • Mare Koit
  • Andriela Rääbis
  • Krista Strandson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5729)

Abstract

Strategies of giving and receiving phone numbers in Estonian institutional calls are considered with the further aim to develop a telephone-based user interface to data bases which enables interaction in natural Estonian language. The analysis is based on the Estonian dialogue corpus. Human operators give long phone numbers in several parts, making pauses after parts. Pitch contour works as a signal of continuation or finishing the process. Clients give feedback during the process (repetition, particles, and pauses). Special strategies are used by clients to finish receiving the number as well as to initiate repairs in the case of communication problems.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiit Hennoste
    • 1
  • Olga Gerassimenko
    • 1
  • Riina Kasterpalu
    • 1
  • Mare Koit
    • 1
  • Andriela Rääbis
    • 1
  • Krista Strandson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TartuTartuEstonia

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