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Orpheus: Automatic Composition System Considering Prosody of Japanese Lyrics

  • Satoru Fukayama
  • Kei Nakatsuma
  • Shinji Sako
  • Yuichiro Yonebayashi
  • Tae Hun Kim
  • Si Wei Qin
  • Takuho Nakano
  • Takuya Nishimoto
  • Shigeki Sagayama
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5709)

Abstract

We present an algorithm for song composition using prosody of Japanese lyrics. Since Japanese is a “pitch accent” language, listener’s apprehension is strongly affected by the pitch motions of the speaker. For example, the meaning of Japanese word “ha-shi” changes with the pitch. It means “bridge” with an upward pitch motion, and “chopsticks” with the motion inversed. A melody attached to the lyrics cause an effect similar to the pitch accent. Therefore we can assume that pitches of Japanese lyrics give constraints on pitch motions of the melody. Furthermore, chord progression, rhythm and accompaniment give constraints on the transitions and occurrences of the melody notes. If a certain melody for the lyrics were obtained, the melody would satisfy these constraints. Conversely, we can compose a song by finding the melody which optimally meets the condition.

Keywords

Pitch Motion Japanese Lyric Pitch Accent Japanese Word Composition Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Satoru Fukayama
    • 1
  • Kei Nakatsuma
    • 1
  • Shinji Sako
    • 2
  • Yuichiro Yonebayashi
    • 1
  • Tae Hun Kim
    • 1
  • Si Wei Qin
    • 1
  • Takuho Nakano
    • 1
  • Takuya Nishimoto
    • 1
  • Shigeki Sagayama
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyJapan

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