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Category Recognition in the Monkey Orbitofrontal Cortex

  • Takao Inoue
  • Balázs Lukáts
  • Tomohiko Fujimoto
  • Kotaro Moritake
  • Takeshi Hasegawa
  • Zoltán Karádi
  • Shuji Aou
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 266)

Abstract

The orbitofrontal cortex (OBF) is known to play important roles in evaluation of reward value based on integration of multimodal sensory inputs. In this study, we investigated the complex cognitive functions in the OBF neurons from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Glass-coated Elgiloy electrodes and tungsten fiber multi-barreled glass microelectrodes have been used for extracellular recording during behaving the visual discrimination task. As a result, Neurons showed a wide variety of selectivity for these complex images. OBF neurons are involved in various levels of categorization and integrate various endogenous humoral signals and specific exogenous sensory cues.

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Orbitofrontal Cortex Japanese Monkey Visual Discrimination Task Category Recognition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takao Inoue
    • 1
  • Balázs Lukáts
    • 1
  • Tomohiko Fujimoto
    • 1
  • Kotaro Moritake
    • 1
  • Takeshi Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Zoltán Karádi
    • 2
  • Shuji Aou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Brain Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Life Science and Systems EngineeringKyushu Institute of TechnologyKitakyushuJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Physiology and Neurophysiology Research Group of Hungarian Academy of SciencesPécs University, Medical SchoolPécsHungary

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