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Development of a System for the Performance and Evaluation of Mechanical Conditioning on Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts

  • Stefanos E. Diamantouros
  • Thomas C. Flanagan
  • Thomas Finocchiaro
  • Thorsten Deichmann
  • Mathias Wilhelmi
  • Thomas Schmitz-Rode
  • Stefan Jockenhoevel
Conference paper
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 25/10)

Abstract

Tissue Engineering can become a reliable alternative to current treatments for cardiovascular disease. In order for safe and durable tissue-engineered constructs to be produced and implanted, the development of a system for conditioning and evaluating the structures is required.

The aim of the present study was to design and construct a system which will be capable of: (a) performing fatigue testing by applying physiological pressure profiles with supraphysiological pulse rates (up to 10 Hz) on tissue-engineered vascular grafts in order to deliver a given amount of pulses in a shorter time and (b) monitoring the diameter of a blood vessel in order to calculate the compliance and the distensibility of the vessel in order to adequately evaluate the effects of the conditioning phase.

It was hypothesized that a system composed by a linear motor that applies adjustable pressure to the circulating cell culture medium through an elastic membrane could successfully create a physiological pressure profile with adjustable frequency. In addition, the use of an optical micrometer can enable the accurate measurement of the diameter of the vessel without a risk of contamination, through a transparent chamber.

Physiological pressure (pulses of 80 and 120 mmHg for the diastolic and the systolic phase respectively) was achieved for frequencies up to 5 Hz. In the case of 10 Hz, only amplitude of 14 mmHg was possible. The optical micrometer could successfully measure the diameter of native and acellularized blood vessels without disrupting the sterility of the environment.

Keywords

Pressure Pulse Vascular Graft Mechanical Conditioning Engineer Heart Valve Tissue Heart Valve Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefanos E. Diamantouros
    • 1
  • Thomas C. Flanagan
    • 1
  • Thomas Finocchiaro
    • 1
  • Thorsten Deichmann
    • 2
  • Mathias Wilhelmi
    • 3
  • Thomas Schmitz-Rode
    • 1
  • Stefan Jockenhoevel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical EngineeringAachen UniversityAachenGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Textile Technology (ITA)Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  3. 3.Centre of Competence “Cardiovascular Implants”Hannover Medical UniversityHannoverGermany

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