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Finding Good Elements for Focused Retrieval

  • Carolyn J. Crouch
  • Donald B. Crouch
  • Salil Bapat
  • Sarika Mehta
  • Darshan Paranjape
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5631)

Abstract

This paper describes the integration of our methodology for the dynamic retrieval of XML elements [2] with traditional article retrieval to facilitate the Focused and the Relevant-in-Context Tasks of the INEX 2008 Ad Hoc Track. The particular problems that arise for dynamic element retrieval in working with text containing both tagged and untagged elements have been solved [3]. The current challenge involves utilizing its ability to produce a rank-ordered list of elements in the context of focused retrieval. Our system is based on the Vector Space Model [8]; basic functions are performed using the Smart experimental retrieval system [7]. Experimental results are reported for the Focused, Relevant-in-Context, and Best-in-Context Tasks of both the 2007 and 2008 INEX Ad Hoc Tracks. These results indicate that the goal of our 2008 investigations—namely, finding good focused elements in the context of the Wikipedia collection–has been achieved.

Keywords

Vector Space Model Focus Element Section Strategy Correlation Strategy Focus Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Bapat, S.: Improving the results for focused and relevant-in-context tasks. M.S. Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Minnesota Duluth (2008), http://www.d.umn.edu/cs/thesis/bapat.pdf
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    Paranjape, D.: Improving focused retrieval. M.S. Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Minnesota Duluth (2007), http://www.d.umn.edu/cs/thesis/paranjape.pdf
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolyn J. Crouch
    • 1
  • Donald B. Crouch
    • 1
  • Salil Bapat
    • 1
  • Sarika Mehta
    • 1
  • Darshan Paranjape
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Minnesota DuluthDuluthUSA

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