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The “E”-Vangelist’s Plan of Action – Exemplars of the UK Universities’ Strategies for Blended Learning

  • Esyin Chew
  • Norah Jones
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5685)

Abstract

There have been national studies concentrating on institutional e-learning or blended learning practices in both the UK and US. Using comparative case study methods, this research adds to the growing number of studies by exploring two institutional policies and strategies for blended learning. The findings are reflected in four dimensions (1) a single strategy for blended learning promotes an institutional-wide adoption without confusion; (2) such an institutional strategy ought to be clear, simple and driven by research and support from an inter-disciplinary centre; (3) Disciplinary and individual-tailored support and external funded projects are necessary for further motivation; and (4) it is recommended to provide recognition for innovative teaching excellence and research excellence for blended learning directly from the top management.

Keywords

Hybrid Learning Blended learning Technology enhanced learning Institutional Policy Higher Education 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esyin Chew
    • 1
  • Norah Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT)University of GlamorganUnited Kingdom

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