Advertisement

An Infrastructure for Pervasive Access to Clinical Data in eHospitals

  • Massimo Esposito
  • Luigi Gallo
  • Antonio Coronato
  • Gennaro Della Vecchia
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 226)

Abstract

Ubiquitous computing technologies are being applied in many fields of business and institutions, varying from small intelligent spaces to large virtual enterprises. In particular, such technologies can be successfully used in health care facilities in order to reduce medical costs and improve quality of service. This paper presents an infrastructure for pervasively accessing Electronic Health Records (EHR) in a hospital. It relies on services which integrate Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) and photosensor technologies for identifying, locating and tracking doctors and patients equipped with mobile devices and RFID tags, with the final aim of granting ubiquitous and transparent access to medical data stored into standard EHRs.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bacheldor, B.: Tags Track Surgical Patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital. RFID Journal (2007a), http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/3222/1/1/
  2. 2.
    Bacheldor, B.: HCA North Florida Expands Its RTLS to Track Patients. RFID Journal (2007b), http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/3615/1/1/
  3. 3.
    Bardram, J.E.: Applications of Context-Aware Computing in Hospital Work - Examples and Design Principles. In: ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (2004)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Borriello, G.: RFID: Tagging the World. ACM Communications (2005)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Borriello, G., et al.: Pervasive Computing in Healthcare. IEEE Pervasive Computing (2007)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Coronato, A., Della Vecchia, G., De Pietro, G.: An RFID-Based Access&Location Service for Pervasive Grids. In: Proceedings of TRUST 2006 - 1st Int. Workshop on Trustworthiness, Reliability and Services in Ubiquitous and Sensor Networks, Seoul, Korea, August 1-4 (2006)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    De, P., Basu, K., Das, S.K.: An Ubiquitous Architectural Framework and Protocol for Object Tracking using RFID Tags. In: Proceedings of the First Annual International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Networking and Services, MobiQuitous 2004 (2004) 0-7695-2208-4/04Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Saha, D., Murkrjee, A.: Pervasive Computing: A Paradigm for the 21st Century. IEEE Computer, Los Alamitos (2003)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Satoh, I.: Linking Physical Worlds to LogicalWorlds with Mobile Agents. In: Proceedings of the 2004 IEEE International Conference on Mobile Data Management (MDM 2004) (2004) 0-7695-2070-7/04Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Satoh, I.: A Location Model for Pervasive Computing Environments. In: Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE Int’l Conf. on Pervasive Computing and Communications (PerCom 2005) (2005) 0-7695-2299-8/05Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Swedberg, C.: PCTS, Radianse Team for Hospital Tracking Solution. RFID Journal (2006), http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/2632/1/1/
  12. 12.
    Varshney, U.: Pervasive Healthcare. IEEE Pervasive Computing (2003)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimo Esposito
    • 1
    • 2
  • Luigi Gallo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Antonio Coronato
    • 1
  • Gennaro Della Vecchia
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for High Performance Computing and Networking (ICAR) - Italian National Research Council (CNR)NaplesItaly
  2. 2.Centro Direzionale, Isola C4University of Naples ”Parthenope”NaplesItaly

Personalised recommendations