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Using Different Humanoid Robots for Science Edutainment of Secondary School Pupils

  • Andreas Birk
  • Jann Poppinga
  • Max Pfingsthorn
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5399)

Abstract

Robotics camps that involve design, construction and programming tasks are a popular part of various educational activities. This paper presents the results of a survey that accompanied the Innovationscamp, a one week intensive workshop for promoting science and engineering among secondary school pupils through humanoid robots. Two very different types of platforms were used in this workshop: LEGO mindstorms, which are widely used for educational activities, and Bioloid humanoids, which are more commonly used for professional research. Though the workshop participants were robotics novices, the survey indicates through several statistically significant results that the Bioloid robots are preferred by the pupils over the LEGO robots as educational tools.

Keywords

Humanoid Robot Workshop Participant Educational Tool Robot Soccer Secondary School Pupil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Birk
    • 1
  • Jann Poppinga
    • 1
  • Max Pfingsthorn
    • 1
  1. 1.Jacobs University BremenBremenGermany

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