A Novel Dry Electrode for Brain-Computer Interface

  • Eric W. Sellers
  • Peter Turner
  • William A. Sarnacki
  • Tobin McManus
  • Theresa M. Vaughan
  • Robert Matthews
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-02577-8_68

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5611)
Cite this paper as:
Sellers E.W., Turner P., Sarnacki W.A., McManus T., Vaughan T.M., Matthews R. (2009) A Novel Dry Electrode for Brain-Computer Interface. In: Jacko J.A. (eds) Human-Computer Interaction. Novel Interaction Methods and Techniques. HCI 2009. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 5611. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

A brain-computer interface is a device that uses signals recorded from the brain to directly control a computer. In the last few years, P300-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have proven an effective and reliable means of communication for people with severe motor disabilities such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite this fact, relatively few individuals have benefited from currently available BCI technology. Independent BCI use requires easily acquired, good-quality electroencephalographic (EEG) signals maintained over long periods in less-than-ideal electrical environments. Conventional, wet-sensor, electrodes require careful application. Faulty or inadequate preparation, noisy environments, or gel evaporation can result in poor signal quality. Poor signal quality produces poor user performance, system downtime, and user and caregiver frustration. This study demonstrates that a hybrid dry electrode sensor array (HESA) performs as well as traditional wet electrodes and may help propel BCI technology to a widely accepted alternative mode of communication.

Keywords

Brain-computer interface P300 event-related potential dry electrode amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric W. Sellers
    • 1
  • Peter Turner
    • 2
  • William A. Sarnacki
    • 3
  • Tobin McManus
    • 2
  • Theresa M. Vaughan
    • 3
  • Robert Matthews
    • 2
  1. 1.East Tennessee State UniversityJohnson CityUSA
  2. 2.QUASARSan DiegoUK
  3. 3.NY State Dept. of Health, E1001 Empire State PlazaWadsworth CenterAlbanyUSA

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