Adaptive Interfaces for People with Special Needs

  • Pablo Llinás
  • Germán Montoro
  • Manuel García-Herranz
  • Pablo Haya
  • Xavier Alamán
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5518)

Abstract

This paper covers those aspects of modern interfaces which expand and enhance the way in which people interact with computers, like multi-touch table systems, presence-detection led displays and interactive virtualized real-life environments. It elaborates on how disabled or conditioned people take great advantage of natural interaction as interfaces adapt to their needs; interfaces which can be focused towards memory, cognitive or physical deficiencies. Applications size-up to serve specific users with customized tools and options, and are aware while taking into account the state and situation of the individual.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pablo Llinás
    • 1
  • Germán Montoro
    • 1
  • Manuel García-Herranz
    • 1
  • Pablo Haya
    • 1
  • Xavier Alamán
    • 1
  1. 1.AmILab - Ambient Intelligence LaboratoryUniversidad Autónoma de Madrid, Escuela Politécnica SuperiorSpain

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