A Scalable Provisioning and Routing Scheme for Multimedia QoS over Ad Hoc Networks

  • Rashid Mehmood
  • Raad Alturki
  • Muhammad Faisal
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5630)

Abstract

Multimedia applications have been the key driving force in converging fixed, mobile and IP networks. Supporting Multimedia is a challenging task for wireless ad hoc network designers. Multimedia forms high data rate traffic with stringent QoS requirements. Wireless ad hoc networks are characterized by frequent topology changes, unreliable wireless channel, network congestion and resource contention. Providing scalable QoS is believed to be the most important challenge for multimedia delivery over ad hoc networks. In this paper, we introduce a provisioning and routing scheme for ad hoc networks which scales well while provisioning QoS. The proposed scheme is analysed using a mix of HTTP, voice and video streaming applications over 54Mbps 802.11g-based ad hoc networks. The scheme is simulated and compared to well-known routing protocols using the OPNET Modeller. The results show that our scheme scales well with increase in the network size, and outperforms well-known routing protocols.

Keywords

multimedia Quality of Service ad hoc networks provisioning routing protocols 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rashid Mehmood
    • 1
  • Raad Alturki
    • 1
  • Muhammad Faisal
    • 2
  1. 1.Civil and Computational Engineering Centre, School of EngineeringSwansea UniversitySwanseaUK
  2. 2.COMSATS Institute of Information TechnologyAbbottabadPakistan

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