Advertisement

Evidence for Peak-Shaped Gaze Fields in Area V6A: Implications for Sensorimotor Transformations in Reaching Tasks

  • Rossella Breveglieri
  • Annalisa Bosco
  • Andrea Canessa
  • Patrizia Fattori
  • Silvio P. Sabatini
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5602)

Abstract

The area V6A of the medial parieto-occipital cortex of the macaque is studied for gaze sensitivity. The reported experimental observations support the computational theory of the gain fields to produce a distributed representation of the real position of targets in head-centered coordinates. Although it was originally pointed out that the majority of the cells exhibit roughly linear gain fields [1] [2], we have verified that the peak-shaped gaze fields reported in this study are not in contrast with the gain field models developed in the theoretical neuroscience literature [3] [4]. Rather, the use of peak-shaped (e.g., non monotonic) gaze fields even improves the efficiency of the coding scheme by reducing the number of units that are necessary to encode the target position.

Keywords

Sensory Neuron Tuning Curve Preference Index Retinal Location Gain Modulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Andersen, R., Mountcastle, V.: The influence of the angle of gaze upon the excitability of the light-sensitive neurons of the posterior parietal cortex. J. Neuroscience 3, 532–548 (1983)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Andersen, R., Essick, G., Siegel, R.: Encoding of spatial location by posterior parietal neurons. Science 230(4724), 456–458 (1985)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Salinas, E., Abbott, L.: Transfer of coded information from sensory to motor networks. J. Neuroscience 15(10), 6461–6474 (1995)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Pouget, A., Sejnowski, T.: Spatial transformations in the parietal cortex using basis functions. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 9(2), 222–237 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Galletti, C., Battaglini, P., Fattori, P.: Eye position influence on the parieto-occipital area po (v6) of the macaque monkey. Eur. J. Neurosci. 7, 2486–2501 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Marzocchi, N., Breveglieri, R., Galletti, C., Fattori, P.: Reaching activity in parietal area V6A of macaque: eye influence on arm activity or retinocentric coding of reaching movements? Eur. J. Neurosci. 27, 775–789 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Salinas, E., Sejnowski, T.: Gain modulation in the central nervous system: where behavior, neurophysiology and computation meet. The Neuroscientist 7(5), 431–440 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Galletti, C., Fattori, P., Battaglini, P., Shipp, S., Zeki, S.: Functional demarcation of a border between areas V6 and V6A in the superior parietal gyrus of the macaque monkey. Eur. J. Neurosci. 8, 30–52 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Breveglieri, R., Galletti, C., Monaco, S., Fattori, P.: Visual, somatosensory, and bimodal activities in the macaque parietal area PEc. Cereb Cortex 18, 806–816 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Moody, S., Zipser, D.: A model of reaching dynamics in primary motor cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 10(1), 35–45 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rossella Breveglieri
    • 1
  • Annalisa Bosco
    • 1
  • Andrea Canessa
    • 2
  • Patrizia Fattori
    • 1
  • Silvio P. Sabatini
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human and General PhysiologyUniversity of BolognaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Biophysical and Electronic EngineeringUniversity of GenoaItaly

Personalised recommendations