An Evolutionary Music Composer Algorithm for Bass Harmonization

  • Roberto De Prisco
  • Rocco Zaccagnino
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5484)

Abstract

In this paper we present an automatic Evolutionary Music Composer algorithm and a preliminary prototype software that implements it. The specific music composition problem that we consider is the so called unfigured (or figured) bass problem: a bass line is given (sometimes with information about the chords to use) and the automatic composer has to write other 3 voices to have a complete 4-voice piece of music. By automatic we mean that there must be no human intervention in the composing process. We use a genetic algorithm to tackle the figured bass problem and an ad-hoc algorithm to transform an unfigured bass to a figured bass. In this paper we focus on the genetic algorithm.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto De Prisco
    • 1
  • Rocco Zaccagnino
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Informatica ed ApplicazioniUniversità di SalernoBaronissi (SA)Italy

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