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Surveying Theories and Philosophies of Mathematics Education

  • Bharath Sriraman
  • Lyn English
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Mathematics Education book series (AME)

Abstract

Any theory of thinking or teaching or learning rests on an underlying philosophy of knowledge. Mathematics education is situated at the nexus of two fields of inquiry, namely mathematics and education. However, numerous other disciplines interact with these two fields, which compound the complexity of developing theories that define mathematics education. We first address the issue of clarifying a philosophy of mathematics education before attempting to answer whether theories of mathematics education are constructible.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Social Constructivism Mathematics Education Research Radical Constructivism Grand Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematical SciencesThe University of MontanaMissoulaUSA
  2. 2.School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology EducationQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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