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The Psychological Effects of Attendance of an Android on Communication

  • Eri Takano
  • Yoshio Matsumoto
  • Yutaka Nakamura
  • Hiroshi Ishiguro
  • Kazuomi Sugamoto
Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 54)

Motivation and Related Works

Recently, many humanoid robots have been developed and actively investigated all over the world in order to realize partner robots which coexist in the human environment. For such robots, high communication ability is essential in order to naturally interact with human. Among them, an android robot developed by Ishiguro et al.[1] has a quite similar appearance to a human. Therefore generating natural motions and behaviors is very important for the android since unnatural motion of the android may give worse impression than other robots as “uncanny valley” [4] insists. Noma et al. showed that 70% of human subjects were unable to distinguish the android from a human by observing it for 2 seconds when a small human-like fluctuations which corresponds to breathing and blinking were added to its static posture[5]. They also showed that 77% of subjects recognized the android as a robot when it was standing still. This indicates that small difference in behaviors of the android can give large difference in the impression on the android.

Keywords

Humanoid Robot Examination Room Conversation Partner Uncanny Valley Special Coordination Fund 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eri Takano
    • 1
  • Yoshio Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Yutaka Nakamura
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Ishiguro
    • 1
  • Kazuomi Sugamoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of EngOsaka University 
  2. 2.Graduate School of MedOsaka Univeristy 

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