Risk Assessment in Healthcare Collaborative Settings: A Case Study Using SHELL

  • Pedro Antunes
  • Rogerio Bandeira
  • Luís Carriço
  • Gustavo Zurita
  • Nelson Baloian
  • Rodrigo Vogt
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5411)

Abstract

This paper describes a case study addressing risk assessment in a hospital unit. The objective was to analyse the impact on collaborative work after the unit changed their installations. The study adopted the SHELL model. A tool aiming to support the inquiring activities was also developed. The outcomes of this research show the model is adequate to analyze the complex issues raised by healthcare collaborative settings. The paper also provides preliminary results from the tool use.

Keywords

SHELL Risk Assessment Collaborative Settings Hospitals 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Antunes
    • 1
  • Rogerio Bandeira
    • 1
  • Luís Carriço
    • 1
  • Gustavo Zurita
    • 2
  • Nelson Baloian
    • 3
  • Rodrigo Vogt
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Informatics of the Faculty of SciencesUniversity of LisboaLisboaPortugal
  2. 2.Department of Information System and Management of the Economy and Businesses SchoolUniversidad de ChileSantiago de ChileChile
  3. 3.Department of Computer Science of the Engineering SchoolUniversidad de ChileSantiago de ChileChile

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