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On the Use of Computational Models of Influence for Managing Interactive Virtual Experiences

  • David L. Roberts
  • Charles Isbell
  • Mark Riedl
  • Ian Bogost
  • Merrick L. Furst
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5334)

Abstract

We highlight some of the characteristics of existing technical approaches to the management of interactive experiences and motivate computational models of influence, a technique we are developing to aid drama managers in the persuasion of players to make decisions that are consistent with an author’s goals. Many of the existing approaches to managing interactive experiences have focused on the physical manipulation of the environment, but we argue instead for the use of theories from social psychology and behavioral economics to affect the adoption of specific goals by the player.

Keywords

Behavioral Economic Interactive Experience Digital Storytelling Physical Manipulation Drama Manager 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Roberts
    • 1
  • Charles Isbell
    • 1
  • Mark Riedl
    • 1
  • Ian Bogost
    • 2
  • Merrick L. Furst
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Interactive Computing, College of ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  2. 2.School of Literature, Communication, and CultureGeorgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  3. 3.College of ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyUSA

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