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Basic Properties of ZnO, GaN, and Related Materials

  • T. HanadaEmail author
Part of the Advances in Materials Research book series (ADVSMATERIALS, volume 12)

Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of the group-III nitride and the group-II oxide semiconductors are introduced here with basic material parameters. These materials generally have uniaxial anisotropy due to the wurtzite-type crystal structure. The basic formulae on the elastic properties and the electronic structures characterized by the uniaxial anisotropy are presented in this chapter.

Keywords

Bandgap Energy Lattice Vector Valence Band Maximum Uniaxial Anisotropy Conduction Band Minimum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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